Manual None to Accompany Me

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Or maybe it is less a fiction, more a memoir or a kind of memoir embeded with fictional situations. I will rate it with a 3 for complexity and difficulty. In terms of credibility I felt the terror of living in that country during the 90s.

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The feelings were also pretty much real. It almost felt like a memoir, but as it is considered a fiction, I will rate it with a 4. The last criteria is edition. I liked the cover, but the editor did not mentioned from where it is taken. I also liked it is a hardcover that was sold with a reasonable price. But I did not liked too much the paper, that was not of top quality, and there were few spelling errors.

Due to all this, I will only rate it with a 3. To summarize, I enjoyed this novel, but I hoped, based on the reputation of the author and the other novel I have read, to be a little bit better. At least gave me some background information about the setting of another novel I plan to read soon. All in all, my final rating for this novel is 3.

None to Accompany Me by Nadine Gordimer - Bookworm Hanoi

Oct 15, Maralise rated it really liked it. Somehow the author managed to create a vibrant and beautiful character-driven novel set in an action-driven time: a revolution, constant unrest and ceaseless violence. She lets nothing take center stage but the characters she so artfully creates.

Not a small accomplishment. A Nobel Prize winning author and a white South African woman, the author is new to me. I will be reading more of her. Favorite quote: "Everyone ends up moving alone towards the self. Dec 27, Will Ansbacher rated it really liked it Shelves: random-long-ago. I started this several years ago and gave up because the subject matter become too minutely political — details of the South African political system just before the ANC took over. Dec 29, Vida rated it it was ok Shelves: abandoned. This seems like a good book, but I just couldn't get into her style, so I gave up.

Nov 08, montana rated it it was amazing. Jul 07, Daphne added it. This is a book that lingers in the mind long after you've read the final pages. May 21, Kathryn Macdonald rated it really liked it. Ostensibly, None to Accompany Me is a political story, a story of the unraveling of white South Africa and the turmoil that spreads from the black townships, a story toward integration of a sort , and toward the time when Nelson Mandela will become president although his name is never mentioned. But, at the heart of the story, is a woman called Vera when she is at home and with friends, Mrs.


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In this way, we see her as lover, mother, wife, fri Ostensibly, None to Accompany Me is a political story, a story of the unraveling of white South Africa and the turmoil that spreads from the black townships, a story toward integration of a sort , and toward the time when Nelson Mandela will become president although his name is never mentioned. In this way, we see her as lover, mother, wife, friend and as dedicated, driven, compassionate, and fearless.

It is during this period of often violent change that the narrative unfolds giving readers an intimate look of the ups and downs of political life as the exiles and prisoners return and the personal toll of shifts and accommodations. At one point, on a trip into the townships, she and her black co-worker are shot, she in the leg. She could not share the experience with him on those terms.

She was not responsible for his existence, no, no, love does not carry that covenant; no, no, it was not entered into in the mountains [where their affair began], it could not be, not anywhere. What to do with that love. Now she saw what it was about, the sudden irrelevant question, a sort of distress within herself, that came to her from time to time, lately. In None to Accompany Me we find both personal and social transformation. Nadine Gordimer , winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature among many other awards, knows of what she speaks, having been an activist and member of the National African Congress ANC.


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Her lyrical—and at times poetical—writing focuses on apartheid and South Africa without a trace of the tract that slips into the stories of lesser writers. Although she takes on a political cause, her stories are literary, giving us fully realized characters that we care about and whose journeys keep us turning pages. Jan 31, Luke rated it it was ok Shelves: fiction. I'm not much into character studies, so this was a slog for me. I was also disconnected from the main metaphor since sex is such a huge part of Vera's identity.

The setting was what drew me to the book, but I didn't feel like it was too consequential to the story. Gordimer definitely has a knack for storytelling little beats and details prove it , but I just didn't like the book on personal preference. Jun 16, Celine rated it liked it Shelves: class-reading.

This one was a quite okay book. I never would have picked it up if I hadn't have to read it for class, but I also didn't hate reading it. The only part I hated was these dumbass straights speculating about the one lesbian in the book and making it absolute clear that they were not happy with their daughter "turning gay".

Fuck that. Feb 25, Donna Flemming rated it really liked it. This was an exceptionally good book, although not an easy read. Her sentences are unbelievably long, with numerous ideas that make you pause and re-read them. There is a lot going on in this book which takes place right after the apartheid in South Africa - it is well worth a second read through and I don't say that very often! Jan 30, Maggie rated it it was ok. This book took me a long time to read. The subject of apartheid was good but the writing was sometimes a little too poetic for me to follow. I almost gave up several times and the way it ended I kind of wish I had.

Jul 02, Elizabeth rated it liked it. Interesting book, but the narration style was too distant for my tastes, harder to get lost in it. Jul 29, Kim rated it liked it. South African contemp Character driven. Mar 21, Bob rated it liked it. This novel takes place at a very interesting transition point in South Africa's history, the end of white domination to a democratic country. May 24, Carol rated it really liked it. None to Accompany Me is about Vera Stark, a white woman lawyer, whom has given her life to helping blacks regain some of their ancestral land in post apartheid South Africa.

She is not the most likable character you will ever encounter, but she is brave and fiercely honest. She has chosen to give her life to the cause at the expense of her family and friends. She served on the committee that worked on drafting the new constitution which gives insight into the responsibility of creating such a do None to Accompany Me is about Vera Stark, a white woman lawyer, whom has given her life to helping blacks regain some of their ancestral land in post apartheid South Africa. She served on the committee that worked on drafting the new constitution which gives insight into the responsibility of creating such a document.

The book is written in an impressionistic style that doesn't have direct dialog. It feels like being inside a person's mind. Vera is always trying to understand what life means and what is her role in being alive. She is very believable, yet her understanding isn't necessarily what another person would experience because she is detached in her personal observations.

She discovered towards the end of the novel that "Everyone ends up moving alone towards the self". That was a deep realization for her. There was another family in the story, a black family that were involved with new government and were under death threats. That part of the story resolved as the the political scene calmed down. Nadine Gordimer won a Nobel prize for an earlier novel, but I feel that probably gave her the courage to write this novel about people that worked to create modern South Africa.

Jan 05, Kathleen Hagen added it Shelves: audio-books , general-fiction. Vera Stark is the protagonist of this novel. Stark, are now moving on to the precursor of Africans taking over. This leads to verbal and physical violence both by whites, trying to keep the land which Africans will now want to recla None to Accompany Me, by Nadine Gordimer, Narrated by Susan Ericksen, produced by Brilliance Audio, downloaded from audible. This leads to verbal and physical violence both by whites, trying to keep the land which Africans will now want to reclaim, and by Africans who still face immense poverty.

Vera Stark is a lawyer always helping the Africans facing these dilemmas.

None to Accompany Me

She was married to a soldier during WW II, but while he was off fighting, she fell in love with Ben Stark, an African, and married him. They both work hard to help their country and raise two children. We see her in various relationships revolving from her work and her wish to be of assistance. As usual, Gordimer has an uncanny ability to represent all the voices and varying conflicts, both race and class conflicts, in this book. None to Accompany Me by the late Nobel laureate in literature Nadine Gordimer is a snap-shot of the early s in South Africa, the years of the democratic and peaceful end of the Apartheid system.

The great impact those years of transition had on the private lives of South Africans is shown by the example of two couples, a white and a black one, whose personal fates are interweaved with events and atmosphere. Even their marriages and relations to their children and grand-children are affecte None to Accompany Me by the late Nobel laureate in literature Nadine Gordimer is a snap-shot of the early s in South Africa, the years of the democratic and peaceful end of the Apartheid system.

Even their marriages and relations to their children and grand-children are affected and undergo change. The language of Nadine Gordimer shows her clear and critical mind, which made that several of her books were banned by the Apartheid regime for a time, in every line. A more detailed review of the book is available on my book blog Edith's Miscellany.

To read it please click here. Feb 26, Matthew rated it really liked it. I really enjoyed this book, but I also struggled with it. Oftentimes I found the prose to be overdone and confused; and I found the way in which she sketched out the novel's heroine to be problematizing. Too much of Vera, for my tastes, was built around her career and her sexual identity. I suppose that careerism and sexual liberty are strong markers of resolute, progressive femininity, sure It's a little shallow.

I really, really loved every on I really enjoyed this book, but I also struggled with it. I really, really loved every one of the secondary characters; and I have a lot of respect for how unromantically Gordimer portrays the society and political body in transition. It's a good book - there is a lot of fine insight and perspective in it - I just found how naively the central character was designed distasteful and shortsighted. Oct 16, Brian rated it liked it. I had never read Gordimer before this.

Never even heard of her, in fact, but I'm really glad I picked this one up. Her style is very dynamic, like she's a film director constantly switching lenses. Her language is plain, but the sentence structure is ornate and farsighted. The narrator's voice is precise, matter-of-fact, and superlatively intelligent without a trace of show-offy-ness. She flies through different points of view, not in a gimmicky way at all, but rather in a highly technical way w I had never read Gordimer before this.

She flies through different points of view, not in a gimmicky way at all, but rather in a highly technical way which, truthfully, was a little too challenging for me. The book jacket says this is her "least political novel", and while the politics of post-apartheid land claims is always present in the narrative, I think I would have liked more politics woven into the plot.

Maybe her other books would satisfy me that way. Jan 23, Chris rated it really liked it. This is one of the better books I didn't like. I struggled my way through it in book group, and was glad I did, even though I didn't particularly enjoy it. It is an amazingly nuanced look at a society in the midst of a radical transition South Africa in the mid 90s , and I don't think I've ever read a work of fiction that captured the complex racial and political dynamics in such a powerful way.

But Gordimer employs an awkward style for her dialogue, which made it hard to tell who was saying wh This is one of the better books I didn't like. But Gordimer employs an awkward style for her dialogue, which made it hard to tell who was saying what when, and her central character is opaque to the point of maddening. Still, she pulls a 4 for the "I'm glad I read it, and I gained some new understanding about the world and human nature" factor.

Sep 28, Kathy rated it really liked it Shelves: , nobel. There is no one like Nadine Gordimer to delve into the grey areas of the black and white conflict of apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa. My favorite of hers is still The Conservationist and Burger's Daughter, but this one had many merits. Her writing is so smooth, so fluid, so beautiful and charged with emotion and nuance. For example, the book contains three sections Baggage, Transit and Arrival First, she takes a There is no one like Nadine Gordimer to delve into the grey areas of the black and white conflict of apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa.

First, she takes a cold, hard look at what she perceives as the baggage in her life, then starts moving toward the place she thinks she needs to be and then she arrives. It may not be a place of perfection, but it's where she knows she must end. Sep 01, Sophia rated it it was ok. A very interesting look at South AFrica as it transformed from apartheid to majority rule.

Yet, too much about Vera's sex life and not enough from the other characters namely, the Black ones and their experience during this incredible time. I can see why many like the author's writing style but for me it was a little too slow. I found myself drifting off often and needing to re-read a page or 2. Kind of interesting picture of independent, professional women with husbands who were less recogniz A very interesting look at South AFrica as it transformed from apartheid to majority rule. Kind of interesting picture of independent, professional women with husbands who were less recognized, less high profile.

The latest novel from Nobel Prize-winner Gordimer about private and public life among South Africa's blacks and whites begins rather slowly, but it includes so many brilliant moves of plot and character, and such emotionally rending scenes and moments, that by the end a reader understands again what a novel can do, and why other genres can't do it: narrate personal and political history on a scale that is both scrupulously detailed and enormous.

Here Gordimer narrates with toughness, yet also tenderly, offering the domestic and professional chronicle of two families, friendly with each other, who work over the course of decades for South Africa's liberation from white supremacy. Vera and Bennet Stark are white, while Sibongile and Didymus Maqoma are black Africans who were once forced into exile for their nationalism but have since returned home.

Vera is the most vivid, contradictory and well-developed of the four characters--a woman whose political activism combines with an unconventionally free erotic drive. Her capacity for sympathetic understanding of people who lack her privileges and experience is marked, and it is a means of her survival. Though occasionally overdetermined by too many parallels and patterns, Gordimer's novel is powerfully complex and startling in its insights.

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